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The Crown’s Game: For a long time, a lone enchanter was allowed to serve under the Tsar of Russia. The job of the Imperial Enchanter was not easy, and needed all the magic they could get to help the kingdom in a time of war. To avoid any disturbance in the enchanter’s magic, only one was allowed to live and serve the people. If more then one enchanter was born, a battle to the death ensured the winner’s fate to become the Imperial Enchanter.

Vika thinks she’s the only enchanter in Russia. Nikolai doesn’t know anyone with the kind of ability he has. The two make the mistake of meeting one day when Vika was practicing in the forest, and are then swept almost immediately away to battle in the Crown’s Game. Only one person is allowed to survive, so now both Vika and Nikolai have been preparing for the job of the Imperial Enchanter, and each of them refuse to loose to the other.

The cards have been delt, a player make the first move, the Game has begun.

Review: This is a good book for The Hunger Games fans.

I certainly liked it a lot, although it did have a few flaws now and then. Like predicticality and character personalities, but I’ll get to those in a bit.

The one reason I liked this so much was because it almost got me out of my YA slump. I took a few breaks from reading it, but whenever I picked it up I was immersed in the story completely. It was very easy to follow, and the writing was pretty descriptive, but a little simple too.

The character interactions were a bit dull. There were some moments in particular I enjoyed, liked the banter and jokes tossed around by Nikolai and Pasha, but I found a few scenes to be either a bit too formal or awkward. Pasha and Vika, for example, were a bit too awkward around each other. They don’t really talk together much, but by how much Pasha talks about Vika, you’d think that they have interesting conversations and can be either sassy, joking, or sweet. Then when they actually interact, there isn’t really anything fun going on between them—their convo is a means of moving the story (which isn’t bad) but is a little detached, to say the least, from each other. Nikolai and Vika are a step up, but their speech towards each other is just as less friendly as Pasha and Vika’s convos. It seems that the best interactions are done by Galina and Sergei. Their sibling bickering was more entertaining to me then the main characters interacting.

I did like Vika, Pasha and Nikolai separately though. I enjoyed reading Vika’s spirit since I started the book, and even liked her towards the end. Nikolai was a good character too, but a bit predictable. However I preferred him that way, it was easier to follow his motives and his good natured actions (some are good natured, you know, when he’s not attacking Vika). I liked Pasha more towards the beginning, but liked his character a bit less at the end. He acted like a child sometimes, which wasn’t bad in the beginning (it was actually amusing), but towards the end he had no backbone to disagree with his sister, Yuliana, so I came to dislike him a bit.

I enjoyed the concept, like I said, this is a book if you’re a fan of The Hunger Games. The whole story took place around the 1800s, which is one of my favorite time periods. I also really love anything with magic, and so I came to love that aspect of The Crown’s Game as well. Although I did wish they were more specific with the abilities of Vika and Nikolai, it was all too vague with what they could do. I only understood that one can control objects, and the other nature.

There were some loose ends in this book too. I don’t like loose ends unless it’s a cliffhanger or cleared up in a novella/sequel. I hope everything gets concluded in The Crown’s Fate.

Rating: ❄️❄️❄️

More: Thank you for reading!! If you want to see Evelyn Skye’s webpage, then click here! Also, if you liked this review then please hit that Like button below, and I’ll be sure to write more! Follow my blog too for extra content and updates! I’ll swing back here again later, bye!

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